Coming home to destruction – afraid to leave your dog at home alone?

Coming home to destruction from your dog

They say that ‘absence makes the heart grow fonder’, whoever ‘they’ are obviously never owned a dog! As dog owners we have all been there; you just run out of the house for a few moments to return to a house that looks like it has been ransacked from top to bottom; holes chewed through the best furniture, the garden looking like it has a mole infestation, mess and destruction at every turn! Not only that but next thing you know your neighbour is calling to your front door complaining that they have been listening to your lovely dog bark ceaselessly for the past hour and that you had better train him or they will be forced to take action.

Dogs are very human-dependant animals, they love us as much as we love them.

Have you ever noticed that the moment that you return to your home, your dog magically stops trashing the place and quits barking and becomes the lovely tail wagging ball of love that you know him to be? One could almost assume that there must have been an entirely different dog in the house while you were out because there is no possible way that this adorable and lovable creature could have ever caused any harm at all, let alone attempt to tunnel his way out through the new plasterboard wall.

A very large number of dog owners are unaware that their dog barks at all, because the vast majority of the time their dog decides to bark, they are nowhere to be seen. The science is there to tell us that dogs seem to experience emotions in a very similar way to us. They can experience attachment and love just as we can, and so it is hardly surprising that our absence can induce an array of unusual and destructive behaviours.

It can be an extremely frustrating problem for dog owners to attempt to correct, after all, how can one go about fixing something that only occurs when they are not there to fix it?

It can be an extremely frustrating problem for dog owners to attempt to correct, after all, how can one go about fixing something that only occurs when they are not there to fix it?

The good news is that there is excellent advice out there that can correct even the most complex of behavioural problems. Part of correcting the issue comes from having an understanding of why the problem happens in the first place, but for those of you who just want to get the best advice right away, head over to The Online Dog Trainer. Its run by an experienced and well respected dog trainer.

For those of you who would like to delve a little bit deeper into the reasons behind your dog’s misbehaviour then read on.

The best way to illustrate the problem is with an analogy. Imagine, for a moment that you are the guardian of a new born baby. Your role is to look after the needs of that infant, to protect it from danger and assist it in its daily living. Consider then, that the child that you care for so deeply is locked outside of the house, and you are locked inside. The infant is completely removed from your control, and in your eyes, in grave danger. This is the emotion that you dog is feeling when you are away from your home. Your dog is simply expressing the same sensation of powerlessness that arises in the above scenario. In your dog’s mind, they are your protector, they are your guardian and they must do everything in their power to keep you safe and sound. So, we can see how it is perfectly natural for a dog to try and do everything possible to get you back to safety, the emotional reaction drives them crazy. Activities such as chewing and destroying things can physically help to calm stressed separated dogs down by releasing of endorphins that help to attenuate their high levels of anxiety. Interestingly, we often see this same behaviour in humans who chew gum compulsively when they are feeling stressed. Your lonely dog is restless and bored in your absence; therefore the only way to occupy him/her self is by doing activities that feel comforting.

It is possible however, to change the erratic and anxiety fuelled behaviour of your dog. The solution lies in altering the social hierarchy of power that exists presently in your dog’s mind. We shouldn’t forget that dogs in the wild live in packs, a strong sense of social hierarchy is essential to the successful functioning of the pack as a whole. Within your home, these evolutional social structures still reign strong in the eyes of your dog. If your dog is barking and going generally insane while you are out, there is a very strong chance that he considers himself the pack leader. Therefore, like in our analogy above he sees it as his role to protect and defend you from harm.

If your dog is barking and going generally insane while you are out, there is a very strong chance that he considers himself the pack leader.

Therefore, it follows that if your dog begins to see himself, not as the head protector and leader of your ‘pack’ but sees you as the prime defender, he will begin to relax and rest happily in your absence.

The absolute best place to understand how to achieve this process is Doggy Dan’s video website where you can follow over 250 HD videos that will teach you step by step how to achieve pack leader status in the eyes of your dog. Remember, Dan is currently offering a $1 trial of the site that allows you full access for three whole days! The method you will learn implements critical principles that Dan has learned from years of dog training, and distils them down into ‘5 Golden Rules’ to ensure that your dog knows exactly where his best role in the home is, leaving you to be free to come and go as you please without any worries about your house being destroyed or your neighbours being very angry. Dan’s methods are very kind, gentle and fun for your dog as he understands how to nurture and encourage your dog to allow it to become its best possible self.

Owning a dog will never be without its challenges and trials. Part of the fun and fulfilment that an owner gets from their loyal companion is through watching them grow, learn and mature into a beautiful, well behaved and friendly dog. However often times, despite our best intentions, sometimes our dogs just can’ be reasoned with.

Need help training your pooch?
Here is a great resource full of video guides that will make it easy. Click here >>

 

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